Dingo still can't come to grips with the fact that Skating Polly is from Oklahoma City, and not Olympia, Washington. No matter, because Kelli and Peyton do both locations proud with their raw, fuzz-laden Riot Grrrl aesthetic. And they put on a mean live gig with the girls swapping instruments throughout the show.

Whenever Dingo hears Purity Ring, it makes him a bit dizzy. Whenever Dingo hears Megan James' vocals, it makes him feel floaty. Dingo might need to have his ears checked. Either way, Dingo really likes what he hears from this trippy duo out of Edmonton.

                      Kick-ASS Women of Rock

Dingo likes women. Seriously, who doesn't, right? But Dingo really likes kick-ass women who drive kick-ass bands. Dingo has seen each and every one of the featured bands on this page play live at least once. And if you check out "The Perfect Month" you can find out when and where some of these bands are playing live in Southern California in September.  

Omniflux came across Dingo's radar at a recent gig at Complex. One woman, singing to beautiful electronic compositions that channel Sweden's I Break Horses and Fever Ray. Dingo says you can't get any more kick-ass than that.

Part of what makes "Hotlanta" hot is The Coathangers. Born out of the DIY ethos, Kid Crook Coathanger, Minnie Coathanger and Rusty Coathanger combine garage rock sensibility with early punk attitude and irreverence. Add a touch of Riot Girrl and you've got one of Dingo's favorite bands.

Little Red Lung charmed the sox off of Dingo when they opened for Wovenhand a few years ago. Zoe-Ruth Erwin's vocals transcend different eras, (often in the same song) and the band's penchant for off-kilter psychadelic sensibilities in their compositions evoke carnival side-shows in Dingo's ever-muddled imagination.

Sad Robot makes a great video. They make even better music, and their live show, fueled by Kat Pawlak's powerhouse vocals and is the epitome of Power Indie Rock with just the right helping of pop sensibility. 

Dingo hears Dum Dum Girls and thinks, "true successors to the legacy of The Bangles." Their brand of pop is dreamier, darker, and comes with a decidedly metropolitan sophistication. But after listening to "Rimbaud Eyes", Dingo feels strangely compelled to listen to "Hazy Shade of Winter." Go figure.

Savages echo the brashness of Pretenders era Chrissie Hynde, bringing a post-punk urgency and anger to their music that quite frankly gives Dingo a reason to get out of bed each morning.